Thoughts in Egypt

Hope and optimism. Notes I wrote recently in Alexandria.

Low on time, pardon my not typing them all up. It starts with an adventure to a citadel and evolves into a story of a day’s conversations and realizations.

Something thoughtful about seeing real pen on paper.

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writing “Amy Robinson” in Arabic by a friend

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a moment of thought

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Map Mysteries

Screenshots mysterious things to identify exploring Google Earth.

First, this is beautiful. On a coast of Egypt.

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Curious (tweet me your thoughts @amyleerobinson):

1. What made these tracks?

1 what is this a track of?, map, map mystery
from higher altitude:2 tracks from higher up, map mystery

2. How awesome would it be if there were a map where you could view seasonal changes on demand? Maybe it exists and I just don’t know yet?

 

3. What is this?

4 what is this?

Houses?

5 what is that there are houses

4. What are the structures built out in the water?

7 this is also beautiful and what are those things in the water?

5. Waves, not clouds?

8 waves or are they clouds

Macro Time Lapse: Great Barrier Reef

Macro coral images by Daniel Stupin of Microworld Photography. Scroll down for video.

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Daniel Stoupin‘s stunning reef timelapse consists of over 15,000 macro shots; each frame is 3-12 images merged together.

Despite the gorgeous footage, this view shows a near-microscopic oceanic battleground. Daniel explains:

By day most hard corals are cute and colorful. Their polyps coexist with their symbiotic algae and depend on light for nutrients produced by their photosynthetic symbionts. By night these polyps open up like flowers, but unlike flowers they turn into fierce predators, extend their tentacles, and sometimes invert their guts to digest the crap out of everything that they can reach. Coral colonies have to compete for substrate with other species, sometimes in violent battles. The winner is usually the species who digests faster or can resist digestive enzymes of the attackers better.

Enjoy the video:

Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

A 30 Second TEDTalk

Imagine a future when you could put on one of Hugh Herr’s robotic biomechatronic exoskeletons and instantly do acrobatics. Imagine shredding slopes like Shaun White. Pair this with a Chris Klewe style augmented reality football visor so you could see real time stats and visualizations of your new iron man esque skills. Thinking farther future, you might pop some Negroponte knowledge pills and Kurzwifi neuro nanobots so you can instantly calculate new tricks, download the latest apps and stream your adventures first person from glass and the drones filming you from above.

Surprise this morning. I was invited to share a 30 second neural avalanche onstage at TED 2014. Opening the final day. This references a few favorite wild and forward thinking presentations from this week which I look forward to rewatching. Because awesome.

Extraordinary life. Wonderful times. Viva TED.

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Video Infographic, 3D

Air Traffic Control company NATS visualizes data from flights over 24 hours. A moving camera path brings out the data’s 3D structure. Gorgeous work. Curious circuits pumping people of the world around. I’d never heard of a Heathrow holding stack! Imagine when we have one of these for the brain..

“A few highlights include the North Atlantic tracks that connect Europe with North America, the airways that run up the spine of the UK, the holding stacks at London’s capacity stretched airports and the military manoeuvres off Anglesey in Wales.”

via Visually

air traffic over europe NATS, infographic, earth

Maps of Ideas

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A universe.

We live in one. Your mind is one.

Human beings, besides generating things like science and technology and businesses, generate ideas. Thoughts. Sometimes thoughts lead to action. Life happens or rather is made by he who lives it.

I’ve been pondering: how could we explore being human from a perspective of ideas over time? Say, my personal ideas over time. A dynamic network, the questions, concepts and values that fuel who I am. Creativities and habits; discoveries and experiences.

If you were to document things you think are important or things you are curious about or wonder, what might you have after a month? A year? Eight years?

That’s how long I’ve been doing this. I’ve amassed 30 Moleskine notebooks, 3.5G or 756 voice memos, 6,000 Tweets and gigs of autotune on t-payne (don’t judge).

How could you map ideas? Here was my first attempt from 2012, delivered for Quantified Self at Stanford.

I spent hundreds of hours figuring out how to map 6 months of ideas in the form of emails to self. A collaboration built through an amazing community of Gephi devs.

Others are making strides in this arena. Watch the below TEDTalk about mapping ideas from the top 25% of TEDxTalks. From transcripts to a network you can interact with and explore. Beautiful. And insightful. How could these ideas apply to the ideas of an individual over time?

How do the things I’m interested in evolve? What new things have I learned and how have they made their way into the projects I create or things I do or learn in the future? When do ideas change how I think? After I learn something that changes how I think, it can be difficult if not impossible to retain how I thought before I realized it. Particularly over years. These deep ideas fascinate me.

So I’m exploring them. Publicly. And I’m going to make all of my personal data public someday. Still working up the nerve to put up my browsing history. The short term will see transcripts of voice memos and handwriting. We may need to create new language processing algorithms for stream of consciousness.

Publicly. If you think this is interesting, contact me and think about it with me. I’m using Quid and learning principles of graph theory, community detection, python, JSON, dealing with audio transcription, and most interestingly figuring out how to build a network/networks out of ideas.

Challenging. Exciting. Neural avalanche inducing.