About

Amy Robinson, Amy Robinson EyeWire, Amy Lee Robinson, MIT, Amy Robinson MIT, Amy Robinson TEDxAmsterdam, TEDxAmsterdam,

Amy Robinson at TEDxAmsterdam. Image by Bibi Veth

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Amy Robinson is the Executive Director of EyeWire, a game to map the brain that began at MIT. EyeWire crowdsources neuroscience, challenging hundreds of thousands of players around the world to solve 3D puzzles, which actually map out neurons. This allows neuroscientists to chart synaptic connections and model circuitry. Robinson has advised The White House OSTP and the US Senate on crowdsourcing and open innovation. Under her leadership, Eyewire’s neuroscience visualizations have appeared at TED and in Times Square NYC. She helped create the world’s first neuroscience virtual reality experience. Robinson curates the NIH 3D Print Exchange Neuroscience collection, which features several 3D printable neurons discovered by Eyewire gamers. Fast Company credits Robinson with “making neuroscience into a playground for the hot tech du jour.” Robinson has written for Vice, the BBC, Nature, and Forbes. She tweets @amyleerobinson.

Amy is a long time TEDster and founded the TEDx Music Project, a collection of the best live music from TEDx events around the world. She was named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 in 2015.

Robinson writes the Neurotech series for Scientific American in partnership with MIT.

Amy has spoken at events in numerous countries ranging from TED to The White House to the Game Developer’s Conference. Under her leadership, EyeWire has won awards, including: first place Vizzie, BioArt Competition from FAESB, and the Catalyzer Prize of the Word Life Sciences Forum. EyeWire’s design was featured at TED, in Times Square, at the San Francisco Exploratorium and in Boston’s Koch Image Gallery. Robinson was featured in NBC’s Nerd Alert and by Science/AAAS Careers.

 

Amy is a partner of HealthSterling, where she developed crowd-sourced population health programs that are now being deployed in Brasil. She previously organized TEDxHuntsville and is currently organizing TEDxMIT. Amy also works with MIT Media Lab biomechanatronics group creating motion capture datasets on yoga and alignment.

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I’m a person of many side projects. I love bringing people together to collaborate and create. Caliber conversations fuel me.

Someone once poised the following wonderful, simple yet complex question: What are you passionate about? They challenged me to answer in 100 words.

Here’s what I said:

Curiosity. Endless exploration and perpetual discovery. History, etymology, literature – Seneca, Voltaire Nietzsche – scientific theory, travel, the human mind. My greatest curiosity is consciousness and how it is that I exist. I am obsessed with systems and complexity. Interdisciplinarity fuels my revelry in reality’s infinite variety. Bilateral symmetry, philharmonic sound, fractals, posture, creativity, the wild. Adamantly I focus and refocus my perception of the world and myself. In 100 words I need but four to tell you: my passion is life.

I’m ambidextrous. I gave the first autotuned presentation at a TED Conference (it was the answer to ‘what are you passionate about’). I like sciences, strong breezes, exploration, adventure, information visualizations, great questions etc. I love discovering other people.

Get to know me via Twitter or shoot an email to neurons at mit dot edu.

Cheers!

PS I am looking for someone interested in space awesomeness to help set up Project HAO (Hammocks for Astronomical Observatories).

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5 thoughts on “About

  1. Explore Innovative Ideas Across the Digital Information Landscape at Digital Preservation 2013 | The Signal: Digital Preservation

  2. Explore Innovative Ideas Across the Digital Information Landscape at Digital Preservation 2013 | archaeoinaction.info

  3. English in the Wild and Mapping Thoughts | Bionic Teaching

  4. We like to think (and hope) that our blog The Signal acts as an informative resource from which to learn and engage in conversations of digital preservation work.  We hope that it exposes you to interesting projects and people stewarding digital collecti

  5. We like to think (and hope) that our blog The Signal acts as an informative resource from which to learn and engage in conversations of digital preservation work.  We hope that it exposes you to interesting projects and people stewarding digital collecti

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